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Herr Dr. Jörg Hüttermann: Kontakt

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1. Institut für interdisziplinäre Konflikt- und Gewaltforschung / WissenschaftlerInnen
E-Mail
joerg.huettermann@uni-bielefeld.de  
Telefon
Klicken Sie hier um den Webdialer der Universität aufzurufen +49 521 106-3150  
Fax
+49 521 106-6415  
Büro
Gebäude X E1-243 Lage-/Raumplan
Briefkasten
Gebäude X / E1 - weiße IKG-Briefkästen

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Johannes Jörg Hüttermann studied sociology and history in Wuppertal, Bonn, Bielefeld and Madrid. From 1994 to 1996 he worked within the framework of an empirical research project on „Strangers in Germany - Opportunities and Limits for the Integration of Muslim Minorities”. The research was funded by the Volkswagen Foundation and linked to the Department of Sociology at the University of Bielefeld. Since 1996 Mr. Hüttermann has been a researcher at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Conflict and Violence. He gained his doctorate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Bielefeld with a study on „Islamic Mysticism in Germany” in 1998. From 1996 to 2000 – as part of a wider research alliance coordinated by the IKG – he conducted empirical research on policing. He was investigating the everyday practices of the police in ethnically polarized urban quarters. In 2001 and 2002 his research interest turned toward „Conflicts over Islamic symbols” (mosque construction, call to prayer), as part of a DFG-funded project. Between 2004 and 2007 he coordinated an empirical project on “Group Conflicts in Small Cities” funded by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research. The Project studied the interaction of three groups: a) immigrants stemming from the former SU with a German ancestry, b) long-established Germans and c) other immigrant minorities (most notably immigrants from Turkey). Since January 2009 he is coordinating bi-national research on („Immigration, Figuration, Conflict: A Comparative Social Space Analysis in Bradford and Duisburg”) funded by the DFG. Together with English colleagues he also contributes to the field research in England and Germany.

Main Research Interests
1. figurational change and conflict in Germany and Europe as a consequence of immigration, 2. the ongoing shift to a culture-focused understanding of social conflicts. 3. the nexus of conflict, space and milieu

Kurzbiographie
1982-1989: Studium der Geschichts- und der Sozialwissenschaften in Wuppertal, Bonn und Bielefeld

1989: Erste Staatsprüfung für das Lehramt

1992-1993: Stipendiat des spanischen Außenministeriums (Forschungsaufenthalt in Madrid)

1994: Stipendiat des DAAD (Forschungsaufenthalt in Madrid)

1994-1996: Wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft in dem von der Volkswagen-Stiftung geförderten Forschungsprojekts "Fremde in
Deutschland?" an der Fakultñt für Soziologie der Universität Bielefeld

1996 bis heute: wissenschaftlicher Angestellter im Institut für interdisziplinñre Konflikt- und Gewaltforschung (IKG) der
Universität Bielefeld (Aufgaben: u. a. Durchführung und Leitung diverser empirischer Forschungsprojekte auf der Basis Drittmitteln sowie Projektentwicklung und -akquise)

1998: Promotion zum Dr. rer. Soc. an der Uni Bielefeld

1999: Dissertationspreis der Lippisch-Westfñlischen Universitätsgesellschaft

2003: Research Fellow am Kulturwissenschaftlichen Institut (KWI) in Essen

Aktuelle Forschungsthemen

Main Research Interests
1. figurational change and conflict in Germany and Europe as a consequence of immigration, 2. the ongoing shift to a culture-focused understanding of social conflicts. 3. the nexus of conflict, space and milieu

Current Projects

„Immigration, Figuration, Conflict: A Comparative Social Space Analysis in Bradford and Duisburg” (Funding: DFG)

Sketch: This comparative social space research project investigates the changing group relations between immigrants and established residents in Duisburg-Marxloh and Bradford-Manningham, two districts which have witnessed intergroup conflicts between immigrants and established residents. The study will use qualitative field research methods. There are two main research interests: firstly, to reconstruct the formation and transformation of group figurations in the relationship between immigrants and established residents since the 1950s in these two deindustrialized medium-sized cities; and secondly, by comparing the figuration processes to find answers to the question why there have been repeated violent group conflicts – riots – in Bradford and why the group conflicts that are certainly also observed in Duisburg (e.g. the call to prayers-conflict in 1996) have not to date escalated violently despite a number of parallels concerning the local context (e.g. economic, demographic, sociostructural). In practical political terms, the study sets out to find out who can take what action to prevent violent group conflicts in the given constellations.
Team: Dr. Jörg Hüttermann, Prof. Charles Husband, Dr. Yunis Alam, Dr. Tom Cockburn, Ruta Kazlauskaite
Duration: 01/2008 – 12/2011

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